The Queen breaks with tradition following Philip's death

Marni Dixit
·Lifestyle & Entertainment Producer
·2-min read

After bidding her final farewell to Prince Philip, her husband of 73 years, the Queen appears to be breaking a royal mourning tradition.

Rather than using black-edged stationery during her official mourning period, the Queen has been confirmed to be using personalised stationery featuring her crest in black, rather than the customary red, according to People.

The Queen in Berlin
After bidding her final farewell to Prince Philip, her husband of 73 years, the Queen appears to be breaking a royal mourning tradition. Photo: Getty

The publication believes the "nod of modernity" could be in honour of Philip, who had a no-fuss attitude in life and death. The Duke of Edinburgh planned his own funeral, which did not feature any eulogies, and even designed the car his coffin was placed onto for the procession. 

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The Times reports both Clarence House, the office of Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, and Kensington Palace, where Prince William and Kate Middleton are based, will continue with the old tradition.

Black-edged stationery following a death became popular in the 19th century with Queen Victoria using paper with a thick black border and matching envelopes following the death of her beloved husband Prince Albert in 1861.

Prince Philip and the Queen
This "nod of modernity" could be in honour of Philip, who had a no-fuss attitude in life and death. Photo: Getty

The Queen did stick with tradition on her final handwritten note to Philip that was nestled amongst a bouquet of white flowers on top of his coffin. It is believed she signed off the card with her nickname Lilibet, her childhood nickname that Philip used.

Her Majesty will likely use her new stationery to respond to the numerous bereavement cards and letters of condolences she has received since Philip's passing on April 9 at the age of 99.

Prince Charles laughs with Kate Middleton and Prime William
It's believed Prince Charles and Prince William will continue following the tradition. Photo: Getty

It comes following news the Queen's close friend Sir Michael Oswald passed away on the same day as Prince Philip's funeral.

The Times in the UK reports that Sir Oswald has been battling with a long illness.

Sir Oswald served as the manager of the Royal Studs for 28 years and acted as racing manager for the Queen Mother. Upon her death, he became jumps advisor to the Queen.

He was often spotted at racing events with the Queen and Prince Philip in the royal box.

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