How the Queen’s jewellery subtly referenced Harry and Meghan

·Lifestyle & Entertainment producer
·3-min read

Royal fans have noticed that the Queen’s choice in brooch over the weekend may have been a subtle nod to Prince Harry and Meghan.

Her Majesty showcased three different brooches while carrying out G7 Summit related engagements, with one standing out more so than others.

Queen Elizabeth II at the G7 Summit.
Spectators believe that the Queen chose to wear the Botswana Millet Brooch in homage of Prince Harry and Meghan. Photo: Getty

Since welcoming their daughter, Lilibet 'Lili' Diana, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been under fire for their choice of baby name.

Prince Harry has been accused of not asking his grandmother for permission to use such a personal family name for his daughter.

The name Lilibet was the Queen’s childhood nickname, as well as a pet name used by her late husband Prince Philip.

Now, royal spectators believe that the Monarch’s choice of jewellery shows that she does approve of her 11th great-grandchild’s name.

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The Queen chose to wear the Botswana Millet Brooch on day one of the G7 Summit on Friday.

The gold brooch features 11 pear shaped diamonds, and was gifted to the Queen from the President of Botswana in 2007 at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting.

It’s believed to be a significant choice as Botswana is a country that means a lot to Prince Harry and Meghan.

The President of Botswana presented the brooch to the Queen in 2007. Photo: Royal Collection Trust
The President of Botswana presented the brooch to the Queen in 2007. Photo: Royal Collection Trust

The couple spent several days in the African country at the start of their relationship, with Harry telling the BBC about the trip during his engagement interview.

“I managed to persuade her to come join me in Botswana, and we camped out with each other under the stars,” he said.

When he proposed to Meghan in 2017, the ring featured a large centre diamond sourced from Botswana alongside two diamonds from Diana’s collection.

Harry returned to Botswana in 2019 to help plant trees, and told reporters that he felt “deeply connected to this place and to Africa”.

“Fifteen years I’ve been coming here,” he said. “It’s a sense of escapism – a real sense of purpose.

“I came here in 1997 or 1998 straight after my mum died, so it was a nice place to get away from it all."

Meghan Markle’s engagement ring features a large diamond from Botswana. Photo: Getty
Meghan Markle’s engagement ring features a large diamond from Botswana. Photo: Getty

For the second day of the G7 Summit, Queen Elizabeth chose to wear an aquamarine and diamond brooch she inherited from her mother.

Aquamarine is typically associated with tranquility and harmony, and represents transformation and rebirth.

When hosting the Bidens at Windsor Castle on day three, she wore one of her more popular accessories, the Jardine Star brooch.

Fans have also noted that the Queen dressed in floral print on two of the weekend's events, which could be a nod to baby Lili.

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