'Rude' coronavirus wedding invite ranks guests in shock move

Penny Burfitt
·Lifestyle & Entertainment Producer
·4-min read

A wedding invitation that categorises guests into a set of group rankings has divided opinion online, as the coronavirus restrictions sees tradition thrown out the window as couples desperately try and pull off their big day.

The invitation divides guests into groups A to B.

Bride and groom walk down aisle coronavirus wedding rule divides groups guests
A bride and groom have come under fire for a very controversial solution to coronavirus wedding restrictions. Photo: Getty Images

Guests in group A are invited to RSVP straight away through a wedding website.

Groups B and C are told to wait for any spare seats left by guests from A who decline the invitation. They will then be offered a place.

Prefacing the controversial ranking system the couple tried to explain their decision to guests in a letter attached to the invitation.

Letter divides wedding guests into groups, with half placed on a waitlist
The controversial letter divided guests Photo: Twitter/von_owie

“As much as we would love to have each and every one of you join us on our big day, we are forced to split our guests into groups to ensure we do not surpass our capacity restrictions,” they wrote.

Also off the list, except most of list C probably, are children and additions.

“If possible, we encourage guests to hire a babysitter for the night and leave your children at home,” the invitation continued.

“As much as we love your kids, we are doing our best to make space for all of the guests we can. We also ask for our single guests to forgo their plus one if possible.”

‘Rude’ or ‘right’?: Wedding invite divides opinions

A photo of the bonkers invitation has now been shared online where it has understandably caused quite a stir.

Though the recipient of the pictured invite was lucky enough to fall into group A, that didn’t stop them from passing it along.

Image of Mary von Aue's 'rude' wedding invite tweet
Photo: Twitter/von_owie

Shared to Twitter by British writer Mary von Aue, the invite has been retweeted over one thousand times, with almost 700 comments debating the divisive move by the couple.

Many agreed that despite the coronavirus restrictions, the invite was nothing short of ‘rude’.

“This invitation is truly rude,” one woman argued. “I see people defending it as “but it’s pandemic planning.” No.”

She went on to argue that there are ‘far nicer ways to approach it’, concluding: “You don’t tell people they’re less important”.

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Another leant into the new trend of making ‘groups’ for friends.

“Oof, this person would be on my 'Z' list for the rest of their life,” she wrote.

“It’s just weird to tell people they’re on the backup list,” another agreed.

Another described the approach as ‘shabby’.

“This is a shabby way to treat friends and family,” the man wrote. “Even if there are compromises to make, this isn't the way to resolve them. This lacks class, manners and empathy.”

Others completely disagreed, arguing the unprecedented nature of the pandemic meant hard decisions for couples, and that these two were clearly trying to include as many people as they possibly could.

“Really tough... but looks like they're trying to adapt to the times,” one man wrote.

“I see nothing wrong with this,” another agreed.

“Grow up,” was one woman’s frustrated reaction. “Realise that we’re in a goddamn pandemic and people are likely doing their best to make it work? Are people this self-centred??”

Another praised the couple’s ‘honesty’ in a difficult time.

“Nothing wrong with this,” they wrote. “They are honest. They are trying to be practical in these strange times.”

It’s not the first wedding that has seen guests rubbed up the wrong way over pandemic-related changes and decisions.

One bride sparked backlash when she revealed she was feeling “really beaten down” over her wedding in August because her bridesmaids insisted on wearing masks.

“But my bridesmaids are telling me that they will be social distancing and wearing masks the entire time,” she explained.

“Also that they won’t even take them off for pictures or when standing up for the ceremony.”

Many were unimpressed, arguing the bride was putting her wedding photos above her friend’s health, but others argued she had a right to be upset.

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