First Nations-owned fashion and beauty businesses to support

Marni Dixit
·Lifestyle & Entertainment Producer
·5-min read

If you're looking for different ways to support First Nations peoples, we've rounded up some amazing fashion and beauty businesses for you to shop at:

Clothing The Gap

Clothing The Gap is a Victorian Aboriginal owned and led social enterprise that create clothing with meaning and celebrates Aboriginal people and culture. Photo: Instagram/Clothing The Gap
Clothing The Gap is a Victorian Aboriginal owned and led social enterprise that create clothing with meaning and celebrates Aboriginal people and culture. Photo: Instagram/Clothing The Gap

Clothing The Gap is a Victorian Aboriginal owned and led social enterprise that create clothing with meaning and celebrates Aboriginal people and culture. The name is a play on 'Closing the Gap', an Australian Government initiative to close the life expectancy gap between Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous Australians.

The company also commits to giving 100 per cent of their profits to support health promotion and community engagement programs in Aboriginal communities.

"When non-Indigenous people purchase Aboriginal designed fashion from an Aboriginal-owned business, Aboriginal people feel heard and supported," they explain on their website.

The company sells a number of items including T-shirts, masks, stickers, hats and more. The website also tells you if the clothing is 'Ally Friendly' or 'Mob Only'.

You can shop online here or visit their new physical store in Brunswick, Victoria.

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Liandra Swim

Liandra Swim is created by Liandra Gaykamangu, a Yolngu woman from North-East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory and their signature prints are all inspired by Aboriginal culture. Photo: Instagram/Liandra Swim
Liandra Swim is created by Liandra Gaykamangu, a Yolngu woman from North-East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory and their signature prints are all inspired by Aboriginal culture. Photo: Instagram/Liandra Swim

Looking for new swimwear this summer? Liandra Swim is created by Liandra Gaykamangu, a Yolngu woman from North-East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory and their signature prints are all inspired by Aboriginal culture.

The brand is also eco-conscious with their fabrics being made from regenerated plastics.

The website also shares that everyone can wear their swimwear, "We love our culture and our people and want you to feel, embrace and connect with that love too."

"We love nothing more than to create meaningful ways to connect, educate and share between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people," they add.

You can shop online here.

Ginny's Girl Gang

Ginny is a proud Gomaroi/ Gamilaraay woman from Brisbane, Australia who started her business after having a "crazy idea to paint a jacket" as a gift for her best friend. Photo: Instagram/Ginny's Girl Gang
Ginny is a proud Gomaroi/ Gamilaraay woman from Brisbane, Australia who started her business after having a "crazy idea to paint a jacket" as a gift for her best friend. Photo: Instagram/Ginny's Girl Gang

Ginny is a proud Gomaroi/Gamilaraay woman from Brisbane, Australia, but currently living in the US. She started her business after having a "crazy idea to paint a jacket" as a gift for her best friend.

Ginny sells custom jackets, bags, jumpers and more and ensures any clothing that is appropriate for allies will clearly say so in the product description as some items are not appropriate for non-Indigenous people to wear.

Shop online here.

Gammin Threads

Gammin Threads is created by Tahnee, a "proud descendant of the Yorta Yorta, Taungurung, Boonwurrung & Mutti Mutti nations", who works on Gammin Threads on the side while also working a full time job at an Aboriginal family violence prevention service. Photo: Instagram/Gammin Threads
Gammin Threads is created by Tahnee, a "proud descendant of the Yorta Yorta, Taungurung, Boonwurrung & Mutti Mutti nations", who works on Gammin Threads on the side while also working a full time job at an Aboriginal family violence prevention service. Photo: Instagram/Gammin Threads

Gammin Threads is created by Tahnee, a "proud descendant of the Yorta Yorta, Taungurung, Boonwurrung & Mutti Mutti nations", who works on Gammin Threads on the side while also working a full-time job at an Aboriginal family violence prevention service.

According to the website, "Gammin threads was born from a love of typography, language and blak pride. It consists of deadly chillwear and accessories for people who believe in living colourfully, paying respect and empowering women."

Gammin Threads sell T-shirts, jumpers, bags, hats, stickers, prints and more with clear labels to show whether an item is 'Ally Friendly' or 'Designed Just for Mob'.

Shop online here.

Bush Medijina

Started by a group of community elders and leaders, skincare company Bush Medijina's mission is to support Warningakalina women. Photo: Instagram/Bush Medijina
Started by a group of community elders and leaders, skincare company Bush Medijina's mission is to support Warningakalina women. Photo: Instagram/Bush Medijina

Started by a group of community elders and leaders, skincare company Bush Medijina's mission is to support Warningakalina women. They also run healthy lifestyle programs for staff and women in their community where they learn things such as healthy cooking, exercises and literacy and language. The company also works with their local Community Development Program to support training and transition into the workplace.

The women running the company hand make all of the products, which include soaps, balms, body butters, body scrubs and more.

All profits from Bush Medijina is reinvested into culture and capability-building programs.

You can shop online here.

Bush Balm

Traditional Indigenous knowledge inspires all Bush Balm products, which are made using plants collected on Aboriginal Lands in Central Australia. Photo: Bush Balm
Traditional Indigenous knowledge inspires all Bush Balm products, which are made using plants collected on Aboriginal Lands in Central Australia. Photo: Bush Balm

Traditional Indigenous knowledge inspires all Bush Balm products, which are made using plants collected on Aboriginal Lands in Central Australia. The social enterprise is run by Purple House, an Indigenous-owned and operated health service in Alice Springs that runs 18 remote dialysis clinics and a mobile unit called the Purple Truck. Creating Bush Balm's products gives employment opportunities to patients and their families.

There are a wide variety of balms available on their website, which use Irmangka irmangka, Yawirriyawirri and Arrethe, which have been used for generations to treat aches, pains, inflammation, skin conditions and ease cold and flu symptoms.

Shop online here.

Indigiearth

Indigiearth is 100 per cent Aboriginal owned and run from Mudgee NSW by Sharon Winsor, a Ngemba Weilwan woman. Photo: Instagram/Indigiearth
Indigiearth is 100 per cent Aboriginal owned and run from Mudgee NSW by Sharon Winsor, a Ngemba Weilwan woman. Photo: Instagram/Indigiearth

Indigiearth is 100 per cent Aboriginal owned and run from Mudgee NSW by Sharon Winsor, a Ngemba Weilwan woman. They source their ingredients from Aboriginal communities.

Indigiearth sells a wide variety of products, over 200 in fact, including food products, essential oil blends, chocolate, hand sanitisers, herbs and spices, skincare and more.

According to their website, Sharon "has assisted Aboriginal communities to set up wild harvesting, business enterprises and purchases produce back from those communities".

Shop their award-winning products here.

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