Dermatologist investigates 4 TikTok skincare trends

·Contributor
·5-min read

Dr. Shreya Andric is a dermatologist based in Sydney. She is passionate about skin health and her mission is to educate the public on how to care for their skin, and also clear up the vast amount of misinformation out there on this topic.

While Dr. Andric has independently chosen the products that appear in this article, she does not receive revenue from the links. Some of the links may return revenue to Yahoo Lifestyle Australia.

Dr Shreya Andric is a Sydney-based dermatologist on a mission to educate people on how to look after their skin. Photo: supplied.
Dr Shreya Andric is a Sydney-based dermatologist on a mission to educate people on how to look after their skin. Photo: supplied.

I'm commonly asked about how I feel about certain skincare trends that pop up on social media platforms such as TikTok. Some are good and some are not so good — here's looking at you, sunscreen contouring!

Below, I sort the TikTok skincare trends to try from those you might want to avoid.

TikTok trend #1: Dermaplaning

Dermaplaning is one trend I can definitely get behind. It involves using a small blade to very gently scrape off the top layer of the skin. This results in removal of facial hair, a brighter complexion and more.

RELATED:

It is a form of physical exfoliation that, when performed correctly, can aid in faster cell turnover, a smoother complexion and will help to allow active skincare ingredients to penetrate more deeply.

It is safe in all skin types (fair skin to dark skin) as well as those with sensitive skin and is a useful technique for pregnant women who have to avoid certain chemical exfoliators including retinols/retinoids and salicylic acid. It is also painless which is an added bonus. The only real side effect is slight redness, which usually fades immediately, and the chance of nicking yourself, which is rare.

If you’re feeling nervous about holding a blade to your own face, dermaplaning can be performed as an in-salon treatment. It is often offered in line with a chemical peel or a facial as it allows products to sink deeper into the skin, giving faster results. It can, however, be done at home using a small blade specific for this and these can be purchased quite cheaply from the supermarket.

I personally do my own dermaplaning using the MCo Beauty Facial and Brow Razor, which retails for about $12. It comes with three blades in total which is perfect as you will want to be changing those blades frequently as well as washing them thoroughly in between use.

MCoBeauty Super Smooth Facial & Brow Razor, $10.80 from Oz Hair & Beauty
MCoBeauty Super Smooth Facial & Brow Razor, $10.80 from Oz Hair & Beauty

To get the most out of your dermaplaning, wash your face first, use a facial oil (I definitely prefer this to aloe vera gel) to help the blade glide over the skin, hold the skin taught and move in the direction of the hair growth. Then use a damp cloth to remove any residual hair/skin cells/oil (it’s very satisfying!) before applying your skincare and moisturiser and cleaning your blade. Repeat every 2-4 weeks. Your skin will feel amazing afterward – I highly recommend it!

Dermaplaning should be avoided in people who have active acne or skin infections. The skin will often be more sensitive to the sun after this treatment so it is important to wear a sunscreen in the morning to prevent any pigmentation from occurring.

TikTok trend #2: Using normal band-aids instead of acne patches

This is another trend I can get behind. Most acne patches are usually hydrocolloid dressings that work by drawing out pus from pimples as well as aiding in their recovery, preventing further scarring and stopping them from growing larger or becoming further infected.

Importantly they also work as a barrier, keeping your hands off your pimples so you’re not picking/scratching them, which in turn results in more inflammation and potential for hyperpigmentation and scarring.

Whilst your regular band-aid won't cut it, Band-Aid Advanced Healing are also hydrocolloid dressings, which retail for less than your typical acne patch does. The jumbo-sized ones can be cut up into smaller sizes so one band-aid could probably cover up to 10 pimples.

I have seen these retail for about $5 for a pack, whereas some specific acne patches can be twice the price for the same number of spots.

Band-Aid Advanced Healing Hydro Seal Gel Plasters Large 6 Pack, $6.99 from Chemist Warehouse
Band-Aid Advanced Healing Hydro Seal Gel Plasters Large 6 Pack, $6.99 from Chemist Warehouse

TikTok trend #3: Potato slices for acne

This guy in this video needs serious treatment for his acne. I feel terrible for him! In theory, potatoes contain an enzyme called catecholase, which is thought to get rid of dark spots, brighten the skin, and reduce inflammation, however, I think there are better ways of doing this that don’t involve sticking potato to your face.

This is especially not going to do anything for cystic acne like this guy has and I actually can’t see any difference in his skin when he removes it. I can’t imagine it would be that comfortable to walk around with half a potato sticky-taped to your face for 4-5 hours either.

You're better off wearing some hydrocolloid patches overnight, using salicylic acid or retinol products, or better yet (especially if you have cystic acne as he does), see your dermatologist!!!

TikTok trend #4: Sunscreen contouring

I mentioned this earlier and while it deserves no airtime whatsoever, I will just say if you have seen this 'sunscreen contouring' video – don't do it!!

Application of sunscreen to your whole face — not just certain parts of it — will prevent sun damage as well as skin cancers so please reapply, seek shade, wear protective clothing... I’m sure you know it all. I could carry on for hours about sun protection so don’t make me!

Personally, I lean towards drier skin so I like using the UltraViolette Supreme Screen Hydrating Sunscreen. My patients who have oily/acne-prone skin really like the La Roche-Posay Anthelios Sunscreen.

Ultra Violette Supreme Screen SPF 50+, $49 from Sephora. Photo: Sephora.
Ultra Violette Supreme Screen SPF 50+, $49 from Sephora. Photo: Sephora.

Never miss a thing. Sign up to Yahoo Lifestyle’s daily newsletter.

Or if you have a story idea, email us at lifestyle.tips@verizonmedia.com.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting