Tommy Little furious over government vaccine rollout: 'Makes my blood boil'

·Lifestyle Editor
·2-min read

The Project panelist Tommy Little has fired up over the government’s vaccination rollout, saying he was turned away from a hub in Victoria.

It came amid a discussion with 26-year-old Rupert Condon, who appeared on the show saying has been trying to get the vaccine for weeks but was turned away from a vaccination hub, despite there being “no-one there”.

Tommy Little on The Project
Tommy Little has slammed the government's vaccine rollout. Photo: Channel 10

“I had the same experience as you of getting turned away from a hub, and then I see ads on TV of the government telling us to get vaccinated and it makes my blood boil because it’s their fault that we don’t have the vaccine,” Tommy Little said.

“I feel really sorry for young people at the moment because I feel like the government is basically gaslighting them.

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“They keep pushing them to get vaccinated and they don’t have a safe vaccine — they don’t have enough of it to go around.

“You are spending millions of dollars advertising for a product you don’t have.”

Tommy Little, Lisa Wilkinson on The Project
Tommy Little says it makes his 'blood boil'. Photo: Channel 10

Rupert explained on the show that he and a friend had driven to he Sandown area on their lunch break after receiving a tip-off from a friend that the vaccination hub there was quiet.

However, when they arrived, they were told they had to book online, despite the website saying walk-ins were being accepted.

After the website kept crashing, they were told to ring the Department of Health and Human Services Victoria.

But after 25 minutes on hold they called it a day, with Rupert saying on The Project: “Our question was, you have an empty hub here today, that’s no-one is in and out, surely you can find two spots for two young guys, 26 and 28 years old to get the jab?”

Yesterday in Victoria, it was announced that nine of the 50 state vaccination clinics will offer AstraZeneca to 18- to 39-year-olds while children aged 12-15 with underlying health conditions or of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander decent will also be allowed to receive Pfizer doses.

"There are many appointments available, go online," Premier Dan Andrews said, urging people to consider the AstraZeneca offer.

Echoing the premier’s encouragement, Professor Sutton said: "I'm a 52-year-old bloke. If I were 25 and AstraZeneca was the only vaccine available to me today, I would get it."

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