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The Morning After: WhatsApp finally lets you fix your message typos

You'll have 15 minutes to make edits.

WhatsApp

Finally. Starting today, you'll be able to edit WhatsApp messages you’ve already sent. You'll need to act fairly swiftly as you'll only get a 15-minute window. To do so, you just have to long press on the typo-riddled message and tap Edit. Messages will be labeled as ‘edited’ if you do so, but no one will see the edit history, or the mistakes you made. The messaging app is catching up with rival messaging services: iOS users have been able to edit their texts sent in iMessage for a while now. Apple’s messaging service also includes an unsend option.

WhatsApp's update is rolling out to all users now.

– Mat Smith

The Morning After isn’t just a newsletter – it’s also a daily podcast. Get our daily audio briefings, Monday through Friday, by subscribing right here.

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Lego’s latest set is a Pac-Man arcade machine with a crank

There wasn’t a crank on the original.

TMA
TMA (Lego)

Last year, Lego released a set for the Atari 2600 console released in the 1970s, and now it's paying homage to the definitive '80s arcade game. The 2,650-piece Logo Icons Pac-Man set recreates the classic Pac-Man arcade cabinet, complete with a light-up coin-slot, joystick and mechanical crank that moves characters around the maze. A complicated Lego set means a difficult price: It costs $270.

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With ‘Final Fantasy XVI,’ the series tries a new direction

Not-so-sweet sixteen.

TMA
TMA (Square Enix)

Devoted TMA readers know this editor is a die-hard Final Fantasy gamer who wants a return to the late ‘90s, early ‘00s glory days for the long-running RPG series. I got to play a preview of Final Fantasy XVI, a game where the company is pulling influences from the likes of Game of Thrones and God of War to make a more mature tale, with an action-focused battle system and no shortage of intrigue.

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Roland SH-4D review: An overdue return to great synths for the masses

It fills a glaring hole in the company's modern lineup.

Roland’s synth lineup doesn’t really offer much in the midrange. Its only two pure synthesizers in the $500 to $800 space are the 13-year-old Gaia SH-01 and the eight-year-old (and objectively hideous) JD-Xi. The company’s SH-4d doesn’t perfectly fill this gap in the lineup, but it’s a big step in the right direction.

According to Engadget’s Terrence O’Brien, it’s a synth-focused desktop groovebox with lots of hands-on controls, a rich sound engine and a more than reasonable price of $650. The SH-4d has plenty of hands-on controls, and it sounds great. Add to that a solid build and the ability to be powered by a handful of AAs and you get Terrence’s favorite Roland synth in a long time.

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TikTok is suing Montana over statewide ban

The company says the ban violates the First Amendment.

TikTok filed a lawsuit on Monday in the US District Court of Montana to challenge the state’s ban of the social platform. TikTok is suing the state directly, stating in the lawsuit that Montana’s law violates the First Amendment.

“Montana's ban abridges freedom of speech in violation of the First Amendment, violates the US Constitution in multiple other respects and is preempted by federal law,” the lawsuit reads. The law prohibits the ByteDance-owned platform from operating in the state, as well as preventing Apple’s and Google’s app stores from listing the TikTok app for download. Although it isn't clear how Montana plans to enforce the ban, it states that violations will tally fines of $10,000 per day. However, individual TikTok users won’t be charged.

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