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The Prime Rib Cooking Tip That Gets It Perfect Every Time, According To David Rose - Exclusive

Prime rib with vegetables
Prime rib with vegetables - Lauripatterson/Getty Images

With winter around the corner and the holidays speeding up, prime rib might soon be the center of your holiday table. And during an exclusive interview with David Rose, we turned to the Omaha Steaks executive chef for his top prime rib tips on getting it perfectly cooked. His first tip? He pointed out that underseasoning can be the downfall of your prime rib's flavor. "Red meats, especially roasts, they love seasoning, so don't be shy," Rose explained.

The television personality advises seasoning "very aggressively" with the classics like salt and pepper, but also adding in creative spices that are big around the holidays. Thyme, rosemary, and sage are perfect examples of nostalgic seasonings that will boost the taste of the roast. But despite seasoning being a fairly important step to a juicy, flavorful roast, a more important rule is to pay attention to the meat's temperature — it could truly make or break the meal!

Read more: Cuts Of Steak, Ranked Worst To Best

Take It Out Ten Degrees Sooner

Person sticking meat thermometer in turkey
Person sticking meat thermometer in turkey - Africa Studio/Shutterstock

If you are cooking the prime rib to medium doneness, then the meat thermometer should ultimately read approximately 140 degrees Fahrenheit, but don't leave it in the oven until it reaches that desired temperature. David Rose detailed to Mashed, "You don't want to take it out at 140 or 145, because it's going to carryover cook, and that means it's going to increase about five to 10 degrees so by the time it rests and carryover cooks, so it'll be more towards the medium well side of things."

The chef recommends keeping your eye on a standard digital thermometer — because we've all been there when the meat accidentally overcooks — and taking the roast out of the oven when the temp is about 10 degrees below the one where you want to end. You can also cook a prime rib roast to rare, medium rare, or well-done, which have different adjacent temperatures, but Rose claims that in terms of a delicious prime rib, "medium is the most" he would roast it. Serve it with some mashed potatoes and green beans, and you'll have a mouthwatering holiday meal on your hands.

Keep up with Chef David Rose on Instagram. Check out the Omaha Steaks website to learn more about their offerings.

Read the original article on Mashed.