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Martha Stewart's Incredibly Simple Trick For For Crispier Waffles

close up of Martha Stewart
close up of Martha Stewart - a katz/Shutterstock

If you're tired of sad, soggy waffles, one of the world's most famous chefs and media moguls may have just the tip you're looking for. We're talking about Martha Stewart, whose surprisingly simple piece of advice is more proof that delicious results don't depend on extensive culinary experience or fancy cooking techniques.

Stewart's trick was revealed in a TikTok, where the cameras captured it in action after cooking the waffles. She prepares them as you would normally, but when they're fully done, Stewart removes them from the waffle iron and tosses the hot waffles back and forth from hand to hand. She says this helps release the steam from the cooling waffles. In contrast, placing the waffles directly onto a plate after they come out leaves nowhere for the steam to go, allowing it to build up on the bottom side, causing the sogginess we all hope to avoid.

The same trick can prevent toast or baked goods from absorbing too much escaping moisture, a primary reason bakers cool their items on wire racks.

Read more: Ingredients To Take Your Scrambled Eggs To The Next Level

Making The Most Of Martha's Tip

waffle iron and cooked waffles
waffle iron and cooked waffles - Burnosova Sveta/Shutterstock

To be sure, this technique doesn't come without risk. Piping hot waffles can burn your hands if you hold them too long, while a mishandled toss could lead to something worse than soggy waffles — waffles on the floor. Using the same principle, a safer and equally effective method could involve holding the waffle in the air with tongs and allowing the steam to escape.

As much as it can help improve texture, it's also critical not to overdo it with Stewart's tip and cool the waffles too much. Allowing them to go cold is among the top mistakes everyone makes with homemade waffles. You can prevent cold waffles while maintaining that crispy exterior by storing finished waffles on a wire rack on a baking sheet inside a 200-degree Fahrenheit oven.

So the next time you're whipping up a batch of homemade Belgian waffles, try Martha's trick, and you'll never have to worry about a limp, soggy breakfast again.

Read the original article on Mashed.