Charlotte Dawson Hospitalised After Twitter Attack

Sarah Grant | WHO Magazine

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TV host Charlotte Dawson has been hospitalised after being abused by hundreds of Twitter "trolls" overnight.

Now recovering in Sydney's St Vincent hospital, Dawson is "OK but obviously in a fragile state," her management told WHO Magazine.

Attempting to expose the vitriolic nature of Twitter bullying—of which she is a common target— the Australia's Next Top Model judge spoke about her cause on A Current Affair and The Project last night.

Yet her TV appearances only served to incite more vicious abuse from Twitter trolls, with more than 100 followers posting hateful comments telling Dawson to "please hang yourself promptly" and "neck yourself you filthy s***."

The abuse even extended to the perpetrators sending images of blood-soaked dead bodies.

The bullying became too much for Dawson, 46, who Tweeted "Hope this ends the misery" and "You win" on her Twitter account just after 2am this morning. It is understood that a friend of Dawson's called an ambulance to her inner city Sydney home at around 3am.

image courtesy of Twitter

Now recovering in St Vincent's hospital, Dawson is expected to make a full recovery. "She's sitting up in bed and she's in good hands," a spokesperson for the hospital told news.com. "She has asked that her privacy be respected."

Dawson has spoken publicly about her 14-year battle with depression, which she addresses in her upcoming autobiography, Air Kiss and Tell: Memoirs of a Blow-Up Doll, due out in October.

"I am constantly bombarded in blogs, social media, twitter about aging and ugly and all those sort of things that if I said that about somebody, I’d be burnt at the media stake!" Dawson told WHO Magazine in April. "You can’t say that about people, you can’t say how awful they’re looking, how Botoxed they’re looking—but its totally acceptable for me to be sledged in that way."

"I was never taught how to deal with negative emotions, and I swept them under the carpet. I should have dealt with a lot of stuff sooner, but I just didn't know help existed,” she told Marie Claire in 2011 of her regrets over not seeking help sooner.

“I eventually talked to a friend, and then my GP, but there are helplines out there if you need to speak to someone confidentially,” said Dawson. She was prescribed anti-depressant medication, but states in her book that she is now medication free and manages the illness with a healthy diet and exercise.

Readers seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact Lifeline - 13 11 14 and www.lifeline.org.au or Beyond Blue at www.beyondblue.org.au.