The Morning After: You can hang up Lenovo's new tablet

·Bureau Chief, UK
·3-min read

Companies will never stop trying new things when it comes to our tablets and laptops. While Apple might be going bigger on iPad sizes — see below — Lenovo added a hanger to its new Yoga Tab. It might also be a kickstand, but the idea of hanging your tablet is what’s new. We’ve seen kickstands in other tablets, the Nintendo Switch or, lest we forget, the terribly designed HTC Thunderbolt, where the charging port was placed so you couldn’t charge the thing when using the kickstand.

Lenovo’s 13-inch tablet shouldn’t have such issues, but the idea of suspending it has some cool use cases if you use your imagination. (Hard on a Monday, I know.) I could see people using it for cooking guidance, with the tablet hanging off utensil hooks. It also means your electronics won’t take up counter space and tomato sauce and the like will be less likely to be hit it.

You could also, possibly, hook it to the coat hooks or tray table latches on trains or planes — depending on dimensions. Further still, the tablet can double as a secondary display: You could hang it from the wall in your tiny work-from-home setup. The use cases are there, but the device is expensive for an Android tablet at $680. I’m intrigued by the prospect, though — and that’s something I’ve never uttered about Lenovo before.

— Mat Smith

Apple may be exploring even bigger iPad designs

Bigger!

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The Morning After

Bigger than 12.9 inches? Your next iPad might be. Bloomberg's Mark Gurman claimed Apple was exploring iPads with even larger displays. Any potential products might take at least a "couple of years" to ship if they go ahead, but still — Apple hasn’t gone bigger since 2015’s iPad Pro. Continue reading.

YouTube took down videos documenting Xinjiang human rights abuses

Its explanations weren't always clear.

YouTube is facing criticism for cracking down on videos documenting China's alleged abuses against Uyghur Muslims in the country's Xinjiang province. Reuters reported that YouTube took down a dozen videos from Atajurt Kazakh Human Rights, and at one point removed the channel itself, for supposedly violating the site's anti-harassment policy. The takedowns followed reports from unnamed parties.

YouTube told Engadget that videos documenting human rights abuses were allowed on the site, and it was aware that Atajurt didn't have sinister intent when showing the ID cards. However, it argued the rights group didn't have enough "educational, documentary, scientific and artistic content" to allow an exception to its policies, primarily showing ID cards, which broke a rule against showing sensitive personal information. Continue reading.

China shares video and audio from its Mars rover

Zhurong has the footage to back up its accomplishments.

The Morning After
The Morning After

China has released early clips of video and audio from the Zhurong rover's first forays on the Red Planet. They cover the landing as well as the deployment and initial movement. There's also a panorama revealing just how far Zhurong has traveled from its landing platform. Continue reading.

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Listen on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Pocket Casts or Stitcher.

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