A Real-Life Chef Explains Why Carmy From "The Bear" Does This One "Bizarre" Habit Every Time He Closes The Restaurant, And I'm Not Sure What To Think

If you watched the latest season of The Bear, you might have noticed Carmy (played by Jeremy Allen White) cleaning the floors every night after closing the restaurant. But instead of using a mop, he — and the rest of the staff — choose to clean on their hands and knees.

Jeremy Allen White, dressed in a white t-shirt and blue apron, scrubs the floor in a kitchen scene from a TV show

According to Chef Musashi Osaki, on his shared Instagram account with his partner Jasmine Stoy, there seems to be a practical reason why this habit is practiced in some of the best restaurants in the world.

Man and woman having a conversation indoors. Caption reads:
@madebymusashi / Via instagram.com

In a recent Reel, Jasmine started by saying that when they posted the "day in a life" video of Musashi's work day at the restaurant, where he and his coworkers cleaned the kitchen floors on their hands and knees, a lot of people asked, "Why can't they just use a mop?" She continued by saying, "...but there's a reason."

Man and woman smile at the camera while seated indoors. Text on video behind them reads:
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

Chef Musashi explained that there are two major reasons why chefs do this every night: "One, I think it's more practical," he began. "You're able to spot all the grime and debris on the floor if you're closer to it. Also, when you're working, you're conscious that you're going to be cleaning the floors later on your hands and knees. So it just forces you to work cleaner."

A man and woman sit casually indoors. The man speaks into a microphone and gestures with two fingers. Subtitles say:
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

Then, Chef Musashi goes into the second reason: "This is more philosophical. I think you're able to spot smudges and imperfections on the plate if you're able to spot them on the floor. This translates into cleaner plates and a better product at the door," he said.

Young man holding a microphone, talking to the camera in a living room. Partial text reads
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

"I don't really know another restaurant that does this besides one in Japan that I've heard, but I think it makes a lot of sense," he added.

He goes on to say that it was great seeing those clips in The Bear. "I definitely resonated with that scene," he explained.

Man holding a microphone, speaking. Caption reads:
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

After Musashi and Jasmine posted the Reel, a lot of people provided their thoughts.

One person said they loved this method because a lot of people in India also clean their floors this way.

Instagram comment by letsdiscoh:
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

While another person said that they don't know if they believe in finding meaning behind the method.

  @madebymusashi / Via instagram.com
@madebymusashi / Via instagram.com

Even other people who worked in restaurants provided their own experiences, like this person who worked in Japan.

  @madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

And this person who worked in France.

A comment by two_plaid_aprons stating that in France, restaurant staff, including Mei, had to use a small brush to clean stairs while still on shift. The commenter agrees it was excessive
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

However, Chef Alex Belew from Hell's Kitchen belives in letting chefs be chefs.

Instagram screenshot of a post by alexbelew, advocating for hiring professional cleaning crews to reduce staff labor and costs after dinner service
@madebymusashi / Via Instagram: @madebymusashi

So, what do you think of this cleaning method? Do you agree with Chef Musashi? Let us know in the comments (or the poll) below.