Photographer goes viral after sharing photos from Band-Aid’s new line: ‘Inclusion is everything'

Megan Sims
·2-min read

On Tuesday, photographer Brandon Hicks shared photos from his recent work with Band-Aid to Twitter. The photos showed a dark-skinned Black woman wearing dark brown, flesh-colored bandages. 

"Recent work for Band-Aid," Hicks captioned the photos.

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As of Friday, the pictures have been liked almost 30,000 times and social media users took to the comments to share their excitement.

"The way I would purposely hurt myself just to have this," one person wrote.

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Band-Aid shared the same photos to their Instagram earlier last month announcing their new OURTONE line of products.

"OURTONE embraces the beauty of brown skin, with bandages designed to better blend with a range of skin tones. Made with our most comfortable fabric, OURTONE™ provides protection that stretches and flexes as you move," the captioned the post.

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Hicks tells Yahoo Life that he is surprised the photos have gone viral. He adds that he was excited to be a part of the project after being asked to take the photos by a producer for the shoot, who was familiar with his work, and he was also able to actively participate in the creative process.

Looking through Hicks's body of work, it is clear that the experienced photographer has a passion for representing Black people from all walks of life with a humanity and dignity that is too often missing in the mainstream.

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"I believe that it is my personal responsibility as a Black creative that I document Black life/culture. To be able to do my part in photographing history and telling the visual stories I want to see is very motivating," he says. "We live in a diverse world. For so long, major companies have only catered to the majority of the country while leaving everyone else out. Inclusion is everything. We exist too. I’m glad things seem to be turning around. Still a lot more work to be done, but glad nonetheless."

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