Forever 21's 2011 fall collection turned fashion on its head.

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Fashion label Forever 21 presented its fall 2011 collection with a twist last night, showcasing models in the form of a hologram.

As onlookers watched, models strutted down the runway and then appeared to veer upside down before walking down invisible stairs and across the ceiling. At one point, says fashionsta.com, neon rain started falling and models sprung up on the drops.

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"Our customers are always searching for the next big thing, or fashion trends before they happen," said Linda Chang, the company's senior marketing manager. "We love that about them, so we are always thinking about how to surprise them, show them things they've never seen before and give them new exciting ways to get involved with Forever 21."

It's not the first time a fashion brand has tried to entice consumers with cutting-edge technology - Burberry, which is renowned for its digital prowess, launched a holographic runway show to open its Berlin flagship store, while Ralph Lauren presented a 4D holographic fashion show in New York. In addition, H&M, which is launching the highly anticipated Versace for H&M collection next month, created a series of "holographic projections" for its Amsterdam store.

Despite the influx of holographic shows, space150 founder Billy Jurewicz, who worked with Forever 21 to create the virtual runway, says we've not yet seen the end of the traditional catwalk show.

"We're not saying the traditional runway show has seen its end, but this technology and concept really rethinks the idea of what a runway can now do," explained Jurewicz. "We designed these holographic shows as a more advanced way to premiere a new line that is more controllable, less hassle and has much greater impact for the same price as a traditional runway event."

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Meanwhile, fashionista.com said the only downfall to the hologram show is that while they're visually stunning, they don't showcase the clothes adequately.

"You can't really see the clothes the way you'd need to if you were critiquing them or deciding whether to put them in a magazine," explained the website.

Images courtesy of Forever 21.