Gender swap skit showing how life is harder for women goes viral

What would it be like if there was a virtual reality game that let you experience life in the body of a different sex for the day.

That’s the premise for a YouTube skit by Aussie comedy duo, Goodall and Gallagher, that’s gone viral this week.

While the battle of the sexes and equality are central to the video’s core, it’s the addition of the virtual reality element that has caught the world’s attention.

A comedy clip about using VR to live life as the opposite sex has gone viral. Photo: Goodall and Gallagher

Joined by their pal Susie Kazda, Luke Goodall and Marc Gallagher highlight some of the ways men seem to have the “game of life” set on the easy mode compared to women.

And the playful clip has got viewers debating about the downsides (and perks) of both men and women in today’s society.

Speaking exclusively to Yahoo Lifestyle, Luke Goodall explains how the concept for the skit came about.

While the battle of the sexes and equality are central to the video’s core, it’s the addition of the virtual reality element that has caught the world’s attention. Photo: Goodall and Gallagher

“We were making a series called Anti-Social and it’s essentially a Black Mirror parody. It is all about the pitfalls of technology and what it’s doing to us as a society,” he explained. “The VR episode was born from us looking at new technologies and how it could work in the future.”

“We thought it would be cool to try and be in someone else’s shoes for the day, which lead to us thinking how would be if we were a girl for the day. There’s a lot of thing that men don’t understand about life as a woman.”

He reveals the pair went to female friends, fans and family members for suggestions and ideas about different things women have to go through that men don’t have to experience.

The clip  highlights some of the ways men seem to have the “game of life” set on the easy mode compared to womenPhoto: Goodall and Gallagher

Since the video’s release, there has been some backlash from fans who feel it biased against men.

“It’s been great to see the kind of conversation our video has started – we weren’t expecting it. On the whole, this clip was never meant to be taken too seriously. You can see it is a bit of a joke, even though it does have some serious things in it,” Luke explains.

It’s more important now that ever for comedy to be a way to shine a light on important issues and help people remember that they need to be able to laugh at themselves and not take things so seriously and be offended so easily. It would create a better environment online. It’s the comedian’s role to push boundaries and talk about uncomfortable things in a light manner.” 

Luke Goodall tells Yahoo Lifestyle he would love to make more sketches about living in the body of someone else, in a hope it would encourage people to be kinder to each other. Photo: Goodall and Gallagher

While Luke would love to see the VR game become a reality in the future, he says the duo are just glad they could get this conversation started.

“We think comedy is such a key way to reach out to young men. It would be great to reach out to different people and different comedians around Melbourne and Australia so we could open this up to so many different types of scenarios. Mark and I are two white dudes so we don’t want to try and speak for everybody,” he tells Yahoo Lifestyle.

“The idea of living in someone else’s shoes means people would have more empathy to other people opinions and their feelings. It’s what we are missing on social media at the moment. Everyone is so ready to feel attacked but a bit more empathy would make all the difference.”

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