Cycling to work could help you live a longer life

Francesca Specter
Yahoo Style UK deputy editor
A midsection of businessman commuter with electric bicycle traveling to work in city. A close-up.

Dusting off your old bike from the garage could extend your life span, according to new research.

The study, conducted jointly by teams from the University of Otago, Wellington, the University of Melbourne and the University of Auckland, was published in the International Journal of Epidemiology this week.

Researchers used data from the New Zealand Census-Mortality Study to do follow-up studies of the population following the 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses. The studies were conducted between three to five years after each of the consensuses.

READ MORE: These £20 workout leggings have almost 2,000 five-star ratings

It found those who cycled to work had a 13% reduction in mortality during the total 15-year-period period of the study.

Whereas, there was no reduction in mortality for those who took public transport or walked to work.

As the study was based on data from over 3.5 million New Zealanders (80% of the working-age population) it is one of the largest ever cohort studies to examine the link between mode of transport to work and mortality.

For background, in New Zealand, over 80% of the population said they travelled to work by car on census day, whereas only 5% and 3% walked and cycled respectively.

This is comparative to the UK, where some 11% of the population cycle to work at least once a week, according to the latest government statistics based on data from 2017 to 2018.

Cycling has innumerate health benefits, and is linked to everything from a reduced rate of heart attack to weight loss.

READ MORE: Doing less than 25 minutes of exercise a day could help ward off cancer, says study

If you’re not a fan of cycling, taking a walk during your lunch break is another effective means to boost your physical and mental health.

Watch the latest videos from Yahoo Style UK: